Pardon Bradley Manning Mr. Obama

15 08 2010

UPDATE 081510

UPDATE 031611 – fixed relocated video

Bradley Manning is a good Soldier who does not obey unlawful orders.  If he actually leaked anything it was in fulfillment of his Oath to defend the Constitution against all enemies, domestic and foreign.

President Obama, do You seriously want to try to expand Parker v Levy [1][2][3]and the “Separate Society” of UCMJ in this climate?  Sure, maybe You can get SCOTUS to go along, but if You do You may have a revolt.  And if SCOTUS doesn’t go along You risk the bullshit decision of Parker v Levy being overturned.

You’re a smart guy, Sir.  Wisely avoid this particular battle.  Pardon Bradley Manning.  He’s a National, nay, International Hero.  If You find it too logistically difficult, politically speaking, to honor him, at least Keep Your Promises to Protect Whistleblowers and protect Him.

Oh, and one more thing.  Don’t murder, kidnap, or torture ahem detain or “interrogate” any Wikileaks Team member. They are working for Peace, and our ability to have sufficient access to History to know where we are.

Are You, Mr. Obama?

:dcm

UPDATE 081510

Listen to the SCOTUS Parker v Levy Opinion:




Hear the  SCOTUS Parker v Levy Oral Arguments:




:dcm 081510 1505hrs

Here’s a video from

From the original oojamaflipper video notes:

oojamaflipper | August 13, 2010

link to petition: http://www.petitiononline.com/manning…

Support Website: http://www.bradleymanning.org/

facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/savebradley

contact Bradley –
Inmate: Bradley Manning
3247 Elrod Avenue
Quantico, VA 22134
USA

Brig phone: +1 (703)432-6154
Brig fax: +1 (703)784-4242

wikipediapage on whistleblowing: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whistleb…

many thanks for the protest clips: http://www.youtube.com/user/liamh2

how wikileaks can save the world: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=od3PYThcVqs

stalk me: https://twitter.com/#!/oojamaflipper

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How Wikileaks Changed Journalism – Discussion :Frontline Club

12 08 2010

Professional journalists discuss the reaction of the release of 76,000 War Diaries documents online to date.  Julian Assange, Co-Founder and Senior Managing Editor of Wikileaks joined in via Skype.

From the Frontline Club:
The controversy surrounding WikiLeaks’ historic release of more than 70,000 classified US military documents on the war in Afghanistan has not died down.

But one thing is certain: online data and its dissemination is changing journalism and the relationship betwen public and power.

In this special event, we ask:

  • How are organisations like WikiLeaks changing the way public data is released?
  • What do the Afghan War Logs mean for the mainstream media and government media relations?
  • What are the legal implications of the War Logs files’ release?

Joining us on this panel are: Julian Assange, WikiLeaks editor-in-chief (via online link up); journalist, academic and freedom of expression activist Heather Brooke, whose successful campaigning led to the full release of MPs’ expenses files; media lawyer Mark Stephens of Finers, Stephens Innocent and Simon Rogers, editor of The Guardian’s Datablog.

Chaired by Paddy O’Connell, the presenter of BBC Radio 4’s Broadcasting House.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

:dcm





Julian Assange of WikiLeaks – Oslo Freedom Forum 2010

12 08 2010

From Oslo Freedom ForumFrom

May 18, 2010

Julian Assange is a spokesman and advisory board member of WikiLeaks, a transparency website whose mission is to “open governments” and expose human rights abuses. It has a core focus on protecting dissidents, whistleblowers, investigative journalists, and bloggers who face state threats, and it largely operates by publishing leaks of sensitive documents.

Winners of Amnesty International’s 2009 Media Award for exposing extrajudicial assassinations in Kenya, Assange and WikiLeaks have recently launched www.collateralmurder.com, a website that hosts a leaked video of U.S. military forces in Iraq apparently slaying over a dozen people indiscriminately.

In his speech, Assange chooses to focus specifically on WikiLeaks’s work against censorship and human rights abuses committed by Western governments. Paraphrasing Orwell, Assange explains that he who controls today’s internet servers controls the intellectual record of mankind.

He warns us that Western governments, large corporations, and certain wealthy individuals are increasingly able and increasingly trying to remove material permanently from the historical record using sophisticated methods.

Assange reviews WikiLeaks’s work in uncovering human rights abuses at Abu Ghraib, Bagram, and Guantanamo, and discusses the dangerous irony in the U.S. military’s conduct as it decorates its detention centers with “Honor Bound to Defend Freedom” signs.

If the West doesn’t reverse its course of increased censorship and rights abuses, Assange warns, it will lose all of the ideals that it once stood for.

Julian Assange – Oslo Freedom Forum 2010

Two Parts


:dcm

Julian




Oil Spill Charity “F-Bomb-A-Thon” on Vimeo

23 07 2010

Donate to help clean up BP’s mess. Buy a T-shirt, button, or sticker. Buy 5.

We all know the US Government will do nothing to discourage the oil companies from continuing the same practices that led to this. We all know the President no longer enforces the laws meant to protect us. We all know the Congress lets the oil companies write their own laws. We all know the Congress depends on oil company money to stay in office.We all know all these things.

So?  Fuck it.  Or, rather, UnFuck it.

-dcm

Vodpod videos no longer available.





Why aren’t Unlimited Text Plans $1 / Year?

28 12 2008

AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, Verizon Still Owe Senator Kohl (And their Customers) Some Explanations

There’s a reason costs for text plans have skyrocketed recently, and it’s not due to increased overhead.  From Randall Stross’s What Carriers Aren’t Eager to Tell You About Texting:

…text messages are not just tiny; they are also free riders, tucked into what’s called a control channel, space reserved for operation of the wireless network. That’s why a message is so limited in length: it must not exceed the length of the message used for internal communication between tower and handset to set up a call. The channel uses space whether or not a text message is inserted.nsa-med

Senator Herb Kohl would like to talk with the wireless carriers about that.

So far they haven’t been very forthcoming.  Stross writes:

The written responses to Senator Kohl from AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile speak at length about pricing plans without getting around to the costs of conveying text messages. My attempts to speak with representatives of all three about their costs and pricing were unsuccessful. (Verizon Wireless would not speak with me, either, nor would it allow Mr. Kohl’s office to release publicly its written response.)

The carriers will have other opportunities to tell us more about their pricing decisions: 20 class-action lawsuits have been filed around the country against AT&T and the other carriers, alleging price-fixing for text messaging services.

We should All listen to what they have to say.

I wonder if they’ll get around to talking about what Common Carrier means.  Does the bus company charge You to use the bus’s rest room while enroute?  It’s there, on the bus, whether or not any passenger uses it.  And You’ve paid for it in the cost of the ticket.

From Ars Technica Sept 10 Article Senator to cellular carriers: UR TXTS R 2 XPENSIV:

Kohl’s office is asking each carrier to explain the method behind the text message rate madness, including any cost, technical, or other factors that justify the 100 percent increase between 2005 to 2008. Kohl also wants data on how text messages are utilized, comparisons of how text message packages stack up against competitors, and—perhaps most importantly—price comparisons against per-minute charges for voice plans, and per-KB charges for mobile Internet and tethering plans. It should be fun to hear AT&T defend why it charges over $1,300 per megabyte for text messages.

Again, Kohl’s office made it clear that this letter is more of an conversation starter (though a fairly forceful one) in what could turn out to be an embarrassing (for the carriers) discussion over high cost of text messages. The staffer did, however, hold out the possibility of further investigation, and even a request that antitrust regulators to look into the matter, should the situation call for it.

Donald Melanson at Engadget filed this report at the time.

Here is Senator Kohl’s letter:

For Immediate Release:

9/9/08
Phone: (202) 224-5653

KOHL CALLS ON CELL PHONE COMPANIES TO JUSTIFY RISING TEXTING RATES

In Three Years, Text Message Charges Have Doubled for Wireless Customers

WASHINGTON, DC — Today, US Senator Herb Kohl (D-WI), chairman of the Senate Antitrust Subcommittee, asked the presidents and chief executive officers of the four largest wireless telephone companies to justify sharply rising rates for its customers to send and receive text messages. In a letter, Senator Kohl requested an explanation from Verizon Wireless, AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile, which collectively serve more than 90 percent of the nation’s cellular phone users. The text of Senator Kohl’s letter follows below.

September 9, 2008

Lowell McAdam President and CEO Verizon Wireless

Randall Stephenson Chief Executive Officer AT&T

Dan Hesse Chief Executive Officer Sprint

Robert Dotson President and Chief Executive Officer T-Mobile

Dear Messrs. McAdam, Stephenson, Hesse and Dotson:

I am writing to express my concern regarding what appear to be sharply rising rates your companies have charged to wireless phone customers for text messaging. Some industry experts contend that these increased rates do not appear to be justified by any increases in the costs associated with text messaging services, but may instead be a reflection of a decrease in competition, and an increase in market power, among your four companies.

Your four companies are the nation’s leading wireless telephone companies, collectively serving more than 90% of the nation’s wireless subscribers. Since 2005, the cost for a consumer to send or receive a text message over each of your services has increased by 100%. Text messages were commonly priced at 10 cents per message sent or received in 2005. As of the end of the month, the rate per text message will have increased to 20 cents on all four wireless carriers. Sprint was the first carrier to increase the text message rate to 20 cents last Fall, and now all of its three main competitors have matched this price increase.

What is particularly alarming about this industry-wide rate increase is that it does not appear to be justified by rising costs in delivering text messages. Text messaging files are very small, as the size of text messages are generally limited to 160 characters per message, and therefore cost carriers very little to transmit. Text messaging files are a fraction of the size of e-mails or music downloads. Also of concern is that it appears that each of companies has changed the price for text messaging at nearly the same time, with identical price increases. This conduct is hardly consistent with the vigorous price competition we hope to see in a competitive marketplace.

What has changed in recent years is the level of consolidation in the wireless telephone industry. The number of major national competitors has declined from six to four. And the large national wireless carriers continue to acquire their smaller, regional competitors, with the announced acquisition of Alltel by Verizon Wireless being just the latest example. As Chairman of the Antitrust Subcommittee, I am concerned with whether this consolidation, and increased market power by the major carriers, has contributed to this doubling of text messaging rates over the last three years.

Therefore, I specifically ask each of your companies to explain why text messaging rates have dramatically increased in recent years. Please explain the cost, technical, or any other factors that justify a 100% increase in the cost of text messaging from 2005 to 2008. Please also provide data on the utilization of text messaging during this time period. Please provide a comparison of prices charged for text messaging as compared to other services offered by your companies, such as prices per minute for voice calling, prices for sending e-mails, and prices charged for data services such as internet access over wireless devices, from 2005 to the present. Finally, please state whether your text messaging pricing structure differs in any significant respect from the pricing of your three main competitors. Please provide this information no later than Monday, October 6, 2008.

If you have any questions regarding this request, please contact Jeff Miller or Seth Bloom of my Antitrust Subcommittee staff at (202) 224-3406. Thank you for your attention to this matter.

###

-dcmSphere-It!





Torturing Democracy – See it

17 11 2008

Documentary GOP Insiders Failed to Block Now Online

A compelling video about the Bush – Cheney Administration’s path to their torture policies is now available online.

(Update 1) (Update 2 – above)

Glenn Greenwald at Salon:

Last month, I interviewed Harper‘s Scott Horton regarding a piece he had written on the efforts of several PBS officials, including Jay Rockefeller‘s wife (the CEO of Washington’s PBS affiliate) to block broadcast of the documentary Torturing Democracy, tortureusawhich compellingly documents how virtually all of the torture and other illegalities and abuses of America’s interrogation programs were authorized and ordered at the highest levels of the Bush administration (of which waterboarding is but one small example).

That documentary is now available to be viewed in its entirety online — here — and I can’t recommend it highly enough.

(Note – Jay Rockefeller is the ranking GOP member and Co-Chair of the Senate Intelligence Oversight Committee.)

Ditto for me. Here’s a link to each of the 3 parts:

(Update! – 111708)

And here is an excerpt:

Also, There’s a pretty good timeline at the Torturing Democracy site, as well as all the key documents in the Bush administration’s decisions to stray beyond the boundaries of the Law.





Warrantless NSA Suveillance Hasn’t Gone Away

13 11 2008

Downloadable Collection at Civiblog.org

Here’s a collection of related documents NSA Gots You! I made shortly after the NY Times broke the story in December 2005 about blanket Warrantless NSA (National Security Agency) domestic (within the US borders) surveillance.

I think the NY Times is reprehensible for sitting on this story since before the 2004 election, waiting 13 months to publish, and then only because the reporters involved had the same story in a book coming out.

This is a comment I left on LawGeek in 2006.

I have been working on translating some of the publicly available PDF’s on this issue into html. They are here – http://thewall.civiblog.org/rsf/house_nsabrief_docs_012006.html

Here are the legal briefs and stuff:


LAWSUITS: Pending Litigation re Warrantless NSA Wiretapping
ELECTRONIC FRONTIER FOUNDATION:

Here is the EFF’s Class Action Complaint against AT&T.

http://thewall.civiblog.org/rsf/att-complaint.html

AMERICAN CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION

Here is the ACLU’s Complaint for Declatory and Injunctive Relief against the NSA.
http://thewall.civiblog.org/rsf/aclu-nsa-complaint.html

FOIA


Here is the ACLU’S Pentagon Spying FOIA February 1, 2006, seeking from the Pentagon records from Talon, CIFA, MX of infiltration, intimidation, dirty tricks, and spying on Richard Hersh, The Truth Project, Inc., Patriots for Peace, Ft. Lauderdale Friends, Melbourne Florida Counter Inaugural, Broward Anti-War Coalition, Jeff Nall, Maria Telesca-Whipple, and others.
http://thewall.civiblog.org/rsf/PentagonSpyingFOIA_020106.html

ISSUES BRIEFINGS


Here is the ACLU’s October 30, 2003 Issues Briefing THE MATRIX: Total Information Awareness Reloaded – DATA MINING MOVES INTO THE STATES with addendum, Shane Harris’ February 23, 2006 National Journal report, TIA Lives On.

http://thewall.civiblog.org/rsf/aclu_matrix_report.html

I put a lot of work into these…the ACLU Complaint has lots of internal navigation. You can go directly to any page from any page (60 pages), or directly to any of the 195 paragraphs of the complaint from the table of contents, a click away from any page.

I hope these, and the other documents on this site are of use to You.

Cheers,

-dcm








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